Tag Archives: cauv

Ohio Senate Passes CAUV Bill

Ohio’s Senate has settled on its solution for fixing Ohio’s CAUV formula. The Senate unanimously passed S.B. 36  yesterday after the Senate Ways and Means Committee adopted two amendments to the bill.  The legislation aims to stem recent increases in property taxes for farmland enrolled in Ohio’s Current Agricultural Use Valuation (CAUV) program.   The Senate’s bill will ensure that the CAUV formula “sticks to valuing farmland based on agricultural production,” stated the bill’s sponsor, Sen. Cliff Hite (R-Findlay).

In addition to including new factors in the CAUV formula,  making changes to the capitalization rate calculation and addressing rates used for conservation lands (explained in detail in our earlier post on S.B. 36), the bill passed by the Senate yesterday contained two new provisions:

  • A three year phase-in of the changes to the CAUV formula, which would begin the first tax year after 2016 in which a county’s sexennial appraisal or triennial update occurs.  The purpose of the phase-in is to reduce the financial impact of lowered property valuations on school districts.
  • Replacement of the seven year rolling average determination of the equity yield rate with an equity yield rate that equals the 25-year average of the “total rate of return on farm equity” determined by the United States Department of Agriculture but that cannot exceed the loan interest rate used in the debt factor of the capitalization rate computation.

Last week, Ohio’s House passed legislation containing different solutions for revising the CAUV program in H.B. 49 (see our summary of H.B. 49 here).  Senate leaders yesterday indicated a willingness to work with the House to resolve the differences between the two bills.  H.B. 49 is now before the Senate Finance Committee.

Read S.B. 36 as amended here.  The Legislative Service Commmission’s summary of the bill is here.

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CAUV Changes Proposed Again, This Time in the State’s Budget Bill

Written by Chris Hogan, Law Fellow, OSU Agricultural & Resource Law Program

The Ohio legislature continues to consider Current Agricultural Use Valuation (CAUV) this session. However, the latest discussion is not of Senate Bill 36, introduced by Senator Cliff Hite on February 7, 2017 (read more about that bill here).  Instead, the current discussion centers on a new proposal in House Bill 49, Ohio’s “budget bill.”  The House Finance Committee is currently considering that bill.

The budget bill proposal would require the equity yield rate used in the CAUV capitalization rate to equal the greater of the 25-year average of the total rate of return on farm equity published by the USDA or the loan interest rate.  The capitalization rate is used to calculate a valuation from an annual profit for an average Ohio farm, considering only agricultural factors.   The bill also proposes a holding period of 25 years for calculating equity build-up and land value appreciation in the formula.

The budget bill proposal also places a ceiling on the taxable value of CAUV land used for conservation purposes by requiring land to be valued as though it included the least productive soil.  The proposed changes to the CAUV program would be phased in over two reassessment update cycles.  The bill would also reconcile the proposed changes with the current formula by specifying that during the first three-year cycle in each county (beginning with tax year 2017), the tax value of CAUV land would include one half of the difference between its value under the new versus the old formula.

Time may soon tell whether Ohio lawmakers will address the agricultural community’s concerns about property tax increases and if so, whether it will prefer the House’s budget bill or the Senate’s proposal.   The budget bill is available here–see page 652 of that document for the changes to the CAUV formula.  The Senate’s bill, which has received four hearings before the Senate Ways and Means Committee, is available here.

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CAUV Bills Awaiting Committee Action

Legislation proposing changes to Ohio’s current agricultural use valuation (CAUV) program has remained on hold in the General Assembly since last fall.  To read this post, visit our new blog site at aglaw.osu.edu/blog.

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Ohio General Assembly passes bill to modify tax on energy projects

Bill makes wind and solar in Ohio competitive with neighboring states

Passed by both chambers of the Ohio legislature early morning on Friday, June 4, S.B. 232 provides tax exemptions for certain sources of new power generation. The bill was sponsored by State Senator Chris Widener and enjoyed bipartisan support. A press release from the Governor’s office makes clear he intends to sign it into law as soon as he receives it.

The new law will eliminate both the tangible personal property tax and the real property tax on new advanced energy projects. Qualified energy sources include wind, solar, and all other renewable energy resources as defined in Ohio Revised Code Section 4928, in addition to clean coal, nuclear energy, and the cogeneration of electricity from waste heat sources.  To qualify, new projects involving wind, solar and other renewables must be under construction by January 1, 2012 and in service by January 1, 2013. All other qualified energy sources must be under construction by 2017.

One impetus for this change in tax treatment is that the current tangible tax rate energy companies pay is not competitive with other states. In Ohio, the tax rate for wind facilities stands at approximately $40,000 per megawatt, while solar is approximately $100,000 per megawatt. This compares to a range of $3,000 to $9,000 per megawatt in neighboring states.

The Ohio Department of Development will certify the exemption and base new payment rates (payment in lieu of taxes) on the number of Ohioans employed in the construction and installation of a qualified facility. Energy companies will have to comply with several other requirements including road repair, first responder training, and the establishment of university partnerships to promote the education, training and curriculum development of renewable energy industries.

The new rates will be as follows:

  • Solar – $7,000 per MW

All other facilities:

  • $6,000 per MW when 75% or more Ohio-domiciled employees are employed during construction and installation.
  • $7,000 per MW when 60% or more Ohio-domiciled employees are employed during construction and installation.
  • $8,000 per MW when 50% or more Ohio-domiciled employees are employed during construction and installation.

The bill also addresses Current Agricultural Use Valuation (CAUV) property and provides that the installation of an energy facility will not cause the remaining portion of a CAUV tract to be ineligible for CAUV.

The new law may signify the beginning of wind development in Ohio’s rural communities. Three wind projects have already received an Ohio Power Siting Board certificate and may be the first projects situated to apply for the new tax exemptions. Information regarding the three approved wind projects and four pending projects can be found on the Ohio Power Siting Board website

Full text of S.B. 232 is available here.

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Bill introduced to address on-farm bioenergy production

Proposal would ensure that on-farm bioenergy activities qualify for CAUV and are exempt from zoning regulation.

A legislative proposal in the Ohio House of Representatives would include on-farm bioenergy production activities in two key provisions of Ohio law:  qualification for differential tax assessment under the Current Agricultural Use Valuation program and exemption from local zoning authority.  Representatives Pryor and Domenick introduced  House Bill 485 in mid-April with assistance from the Ohio Department of Agriculture.  The bill was referred to the House Agriculture and Natural Resources Committee, but no other action on the bill has taken place.

The proposal addresses “biodiesel production, biomass energy production, electric or heat energy production and biologically derived methane gas production”  where at least 50% of the starting material or feedstocks are from the same tract, lot or parcel on which the energy production takes place.  This 50% requirement targets on-farm energy production, where a farm is producing and processing the energy inputs, as long as no more than 50% of the supplementary inputs derive from other properties.

The bioenergy production activities that meet the 50% rule would be included in the CAUV’ program’s definition of “land devoted exclusively to agricultural use” in ORC 5713.30, thus guaranteeing eligibility for the CAUV property tax rate.  The bioenergy production activities would also become part of the definition of “agriculture” for purposes of county and township zoning, ORC 303.01 and ORC 519.01.  Because counties and townships have  limited zoning authority over “agriculture,” the proposal would ensure that a county or township could not use zoning authority to prohibit the qualifying bioenergy production activities. 

H.B. 485 is available online, here.

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Filed under Crop Issues, Property, Renewable Energy, Zoning